Cardiac Catheterisation book launched

clip_image001While the corrective procedure for the majority of congenital heart disorders is surgery, there are a handful of heart
conditions that do not require surgery to correct.

Cardiac catheterisation, which is a diagnostic test used to
determine the severity of a heart disorder, can, in some cases, actually be used as a corrective measure.

Following the launch of Mending a Broken Heart in 2008, we’re pleased to announce that we’ve launched a similar book that covers cardiac catheterisation, to help children and their parents through the process of diagnosis and treatment.

Hearing that your child has a heart problem and needs
surgery strikes fear into every parent’s heart. And being able to offer easily-understandable answers to parents’ questions is just one way that the WSPCCA is working to make the
process of diagnosis, surgery and recovery easier to cope with.

Both Mending a Broken Heart books is available from the WSPCCA at Netcare Sunninghill
Hospital.

For more information, contact Lynda Bleazard on 011 257 2017.

Advertisements

About The WSPCF

The Walter Sisulu Paediatric Cardiac Foundation (WSPCF) is a philanthropic paediatric cardiac foundation for Africa, focussing on delivering life-saving surgery for underprivileged children with congenital heart disorders from across Africa. It also aims to develop diagnostic and treatment skills amongst Africa’s medical fraternity and conducts critical research into paediatric cardiac healthcare. The cardiac surgery or intervention is undertaken at the Walter Sisulu Paediatric Cardiac Centre for Africa situated in Netcare Sunninghill Hospital in Johannesburg, , as well as at Cape Town’s Netcare Christian Barnard Memorial and Red Cross Children’s Hospitals. The WSPCF was founded by Dr. Robin Kinsley in 2003, and was established as a living legacy to the late Walter Sisulu and his widow, Albertina, both of whom dedicated their lives to helping children in need.
This entry was posted in Development & Training, For Parents and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s